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Peeling Back the Layers is born!

Huzzah!

We have been successful in securing funding for our project, ‘Peeling Back the Layers – A Community Archaeology Project at Under Whitle’.


We, the Tudor Farming Interpretation Group (TFIG), have received £52,900 from the Heritage Lottery Fund for “Peeling Back the Layers”, an exciting community and educational archaeology project based at Under Whitle near Longnor in the Peak District. We have also received funds from the Council for British Archaeology’s  Mick Aston Archaeology Fund (supported by English Heritage) and the Peak District National Park Authority and their Sustainable Development Fund.


Led by volunteers from the local community, the project aims to explore archaeological features at Under Whitle, Sheen and discover if they connect to Tudor documents relating to a farm here more than 400 years ago.


The project will enable people, young and old, to take part in an archaeological survey and excavation under the guidance of professional archaeologists.  Schools, groups and individuals will be able to take out their trowels and literally “peel back the layers”, discovering what actually lies beneath the turf and how it fits into the wide landscape of the Peak District.


Participants will be provided with on-site training about archaeological processes and techniques as well as carrying out surveys and digging in the excavation trenches.  There’s also a chance to work with historians and research local history, as well as learning how to process finds and interpret archaeological survey data.  There are opportunities to learn how to edit websites and share up-to-date results in a “News from the Trenches” blog, or even work with artists to create a children’s comic based on the findings of the excavation.


Our very own Margaret Black said, “This project gives us a fabulous opportunity to share a real life archaeological dig with local people, schools, groups and other history buffs like ourselves.  We’re so grateful to the Heritage Lottery Fund and our other funders, the Council for British Archaeology’s  Mick Aston Archaeology Fund (supported by English Heritage), The Peak District National Park Authority and their Sustainable Development Fund, all of whom have helped us to make this project happen.”

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